Dog Crate Sizes – Chart, Dimensions and Weights

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Choosing the correct size of dog crate for your canine companion is crucial for your dog’s comfort and successful crate training.

But how do you know what size crate to choose? How do you measure your pup for a crate? Do you need a larger crate for travel?

Read this comprehensive guide to learn how to choose the correct crate size for your dog.

Dog Crate Sizes At A Glance

The Papillon Spaniel Continental Dog Sits at the Travel Cage

The chart below gives you a guide to finding the correct crate size for your dog.

When choosing your dog’s ideal crate, you must consider:

  • The crate size is more important than its weight.
  • The crate needs to be at least 4″ longer than the dog’s body length and 4″ higher than the dog’s shoulder to be a comfortable fit.
  • If you have a puppy, bear in mind that the pups’ gender and possible mixed breeding might mean that your pet needs a larger or smaller crate than is listed in the list below.

If you have a puppy, consider buying a larger crate than your pup needs and make it smaller by using a crate divider. As your puppy grows, simply move the divider to enlarge the crate. That saves you from having to buy another crate every time your puppy outgrows the last.

Dog Crate Size, Dimension & Weight

Crate Size

Approximate Dog Weight

Breed Examples

18″x18″ or 18″x24″

Under 24 lbs
Under 30 lbs

Chihuahua

24″x18″ or 24″x24″

Under 30 lbs
Under 38 lbs

Affenpinscher, Cairn Terrier, Havanese, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Skye Terrier, Silky Terrier, Toy Poodle, Toy Fox Terrier, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

24″x30″ or 24″x36″

Under 40 lbs
Under 40 lbs

Cocker Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basset Hound, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, Jack Russell Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Poodle, Schnauzer, Parson Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Fox Terrier, Welsh Terrier, Norwich Terrier

30″x24″ or
30″x30″ or 30″x36″

0-40 lbs
40-50 lbs
50-60 lbs

American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier, Cocker Spaniel

36″x24″ or
36″x30″ or 36″x36″

40-60 lbs
50-60 lbs
60-80 lbs

American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog

42″x30″ or 42″x36″

80-100 lbs
80-100 lbs

Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, American Bulldog, Boxer, Briard, Malinois, Tervueren

48″x24″ or 48″x30″

80-90 lbs
80-100 lbs

Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, Boxer, Briard, Dalmatian, Malinois, Tervueren, Golden retriever, Labrador retriever

48″x36″

Up to 100 lbs

Afghan, Akita, Bloodhound, Borzoi, Chinook, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Irish Setter, Leonberger, Neopolitan Mastiff, Newfoundland, Pointer, Rottweiler, Siberian Husky, Standard Poodle, Weimaraner

60″x36″ or 72″x36″

100-150 lbs
150-180 lbs

Akita, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bullmastiff, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Leonberger, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Siberian Husky

Crate Size

18″x18″ or 18″x24″

Approximate Dog Weight

Under 24 lbs
Under 30 lbs

Breed Examples

Chihuahua

Crate Size

24″x18″ or 24″x24″

Approximate Dog Weight

Under 30 lbs
Under 38 lbs

Breed Examples

Affenpinscher, Cairn Terrier, Havanese, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Skye Terrier, Silky Terrier, Toy Poodle, Toy Fox Terrier, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

Crate Size

24″x30″ or 24″x36″

Approximate Dog Weight

Under 40 lbs
Under 40 lbs

Breed Examples

Cocker Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basset Hound, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, Jack Russell Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Poodle, Schnauzer, Parson Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Fox Terrier, Welsh Terrier, Norwich Terrier

Crate Size

30″x24″ or
30″x30″ or 30″x36″

Approximate Dog Weight

0-40 lbs
40-50 lbs
50-60 lbs

Breed Examples

American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier, Cocker Spaniel

Crate Size

36″x24″ or
36″x30″ or 36″x36″

Approximate Dog Weight

40-60 lbs
50-60 lbs
60-80 lbs

Breed Examples

American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog

Crate Size

42″x30″ or 42″x36″

Approximate Dog Weight

80-100 lbs
80-100 lbs

Breed Examples

Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, American Bulldog, Boxer, Briard, Malinois, Tervueren

Crate Size

48″x24″ or 48″x30″

Approximate Dog Weight

80-90 lbs
80-100 lbs

Breed Examples

Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, Boxer, Briard, Dalmatian, Malinois, Tervueren, Golden retriever, Labrador retriever

Crate Size

48″x36″

Approximate Dog Weight

Up to 100 lbs

Breed Examples

Afghan, Akita, Bloodhound, Borzoi, Chinook, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Irish Setter, Leonberger, Neopolitan Mastiff, Newfoundland, Pointer, Rottweiler, Siberian Husky, Standard Poodle, Weimaraner

Crate Size

60″x36″ or 72″x36″

Approximate Dog Weight

100-150 lbs
150-180 lbs

Breed Examples

Akita, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bullmastiff, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Leonberger, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Siberian Husky

Crate Sizing Guide

Often, dog crates are advertised as small, extra small, etc. Here’s a quick crate sizing guide to help you choose the right one:

Extra-Small

Extra-small dog crates measure 18″ – 22″ (45 – 56cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing up to 25lbs (11kg).

Small

Small dog crates measure 24″ (61cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing up to 25lbs (11kg). See our post on the best dog crates for small dogs.

Medium

Medium dog crates measure 30″ (76cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing 26 – 40lbs (12 – 18kg).

Intermediate

Intermediate dog crates measure 36″ (91cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing 41 – 70lbs (18 – 32kg).

Large

Large dog crates measure 42″ (107cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing 71 – 90lbs (32 – 41kg).

Extra-Large

Extra-Large dog crates measure 48″ (122cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing 91 – 110lbs (41 – 50kg).

XXL

XXL dog crates measure 54″ (137cm) and are designed to take dogs weighing over 110lbs (50+kg).

Basically, the crate should be large enough for your dog to stand at its full height and stretch out to sleep without being cramped. 

Once you’ve worked out what size crate you need for your dog, measure the space you have available in your home for the crate to ensure the crate fits there.

Why Do You Need A Dog Crate?

Dog crates have several important functions, including:

  • Providing a safe, cozy space where your dog can relax and fulfill his natural instinct to build a den
  • Potty training a puppy
  • Confining a destructive dog
  • Safe travel for you and your dog
  • Safely contain your dog when you’re not around
  • Providing a comfortable, peaceful place where a sick or injured dog can recuperate

Safe Haven

First and foremost, your dog’s crate should be a safe space for your pup where he wants to spend his downtime, relaxing and just chilling out.

Once your dog gets used to the idea of spending time in his crate, he will go into the crate voluntarily, regarding it as a cozy den that’s his special place. That can be very comforting for dogs that dislike the noise of a busy family home and for those that are naturally shy characters.

Potty Training Puppies

Most pet parents use wire crates as a training tool when toilet training puppies. 

Dogs do not voluntarily soil their sleeping area, so by crating your puppy, you can get the message across that he must hold his bladder until you let him outside.

Obviously, you must not make your dog wait for too long before you let him out for a potty break. Remember that young puppies and senior dogs cannot hold on for as long as older pups. 

Preventing Destructive Behaviors

Teething puppies and some older dogs can be very destructive around the house, chewing your furniture, clothing, and valuables. Dogs that chew can also put themselves in danger if they get hold of household cleaning products, medicines, or power cables.

By confining your dog to his crate when you’re not around to watch him, you can keep your belongings safe from the unwanted attentions of your furry friend.

Safe Travel

Obedient dachshund dog sits in blue pet carrier in public place and waits the owner. Safe travel with animals by plane or train. Customs quarantine before or after transporting animals across border

Using a pet carrier is the safest way of taking road trips with your dog for you, your pet, and your car passengers. Many jurisdictions regard a dog riding loose in a vehicle as a distraction, and you could find yourself on the wrong side of the law if you don’t have your dog confined in a crate while you’re driving.

For airline travel, most carriers insist that larger dogs travel in the cargo hold in a plastic crate, while smaller breeds can sometimes ride with you in the passenger cabin in a plastic or soft-sided crate. However, every airline has different requirements, so you need to check with individual carriers before you travel.

Safety For Your Dog

Puppies and dogs are very good at getting into mischief when their owners are not around to watch them!

There are lots of hazards in the average home, including:

  • toxic chemicals
  • human medicines
  • electrical cables
  • tight spaces
  • high places that a dog could fall from
  • poisonous plants

So, the safest place for your dog to be when you’re not home is confined safely in a comfortable crate.

Also, in an emergency situation, it’s much easier and safer for the emergency responders to find and rescue your dog if he’s safely crated.

Recuperation

dog in travelling crate

If your dog has to go to the veterinary clinic for surgery or if your pet is sick, he will appreciate a quiet, comfortable crate in which to recuperate.

In fact, most vet practices and hospitals use crates for recuperation purposes, so if your dog is already crate trained, he won’t find the experience too stressful.

What to Consider When Choosing A Dog Crate?

Your choice of a crate will be influenced by several factors:

Size

Your dog must have the correct size crate to be comfortable and safe.

If the crate is too big, your pup might use one end of the crate as a toilet area. However, if the crate is too small, your dog won’t be able to lay down comfortably, stand up, or turn around, which could leave your pup feeling stressed and anxious. In severely neglectful cases it can lead to something called cage feet.

So, follow the size chart shown at the beginning of this article to choose the correct size of crate for your pup.

Does The Crate Fit Your Home?

black and white dog in metal cage or crate

It’s all very well and good having a classic crate that’s the perfect fit for your dog, but you need the crate to fit your home, too!

Measure the space where you want to keep the crate and double-check that the door will open completely so that your dog can get in and out of his den easily without bumping himself on the doorframe.

Some types of crates are designed with double doors or even with a door in the roof, specifically to accommodate tight spaces. So, if space is at a premium in your home, you might want to consider buying a multi-door crate.

If you want to store the crate when it’s not in use, you’ll need to choose a collapsible dog crate that’s quick and easy to disassemble. Finally, if you intend to use the crate outside, be sure to choose one that’s weather-resistant and easily portable.

Will Your Dog Grow?

If you have a puppy or a very young dog, the chances are that he will outgrow his crate pretty quickly. To accommodate that, you’ll need a crate with a divider panel. That way, as your puppy grows, you can move the panels to enlarge the crate, saving you the cost of continually having to upsize the crate.

Crate dividers are also essential if you’re potty training your puppy, as you can make the crate small enough to dissuade your pup from using one end of the crate as a toilet area.

Is Your Dog Nosey?

Many dogs are curious, enjoying a “room with a view.” If that sounds like your dog, you’ll need to pick a crate that allows the dog to enjoy a good view of his surroundings.

Other pups can become anxious and stressed when they feel exposed, in which case, you’ll need a  more enclosed crate or perhaps one with a cover.

Is Your Dog A Houdini Hound?

LUCKUP Heavy Duty Metal Dog Crate For Large Dogs
Image Source

Some dogs are born escape artists and will attempt to break out of their crates simply because they love the challenge! 

These dogs need an escape-proof crate with reinforced joints, strong welds, and strong door locks. Generally, soft-sided crates are not suitable for Houdini hounds, as they are not robust enough to withstand prolonged escape attempts.

That said, some determined dogs can injure themselves when attempting to escape their crate. So, you need to work out why your dog is attempting to escape and take time out to teach your dog how to stay calm in his crate.

Purpose

Although some crates are versatile, many are one-trick ponies that are only suitable for one job. For example, a furniture-style dog crate is not any good for you if you want to use your crate for traveling with your dog.

In this example, if you want a dual-purpose crate that you can use in your home and for travel, a collapsible metal crate might be the best bet.

If you have a puppy, choose a crate with divider panels. That means you won’t need to keep buying a new crate whenever your puppy outgrows his existing crate.

Multiple Dogs?

HomeyPet Stackable Heavy Duty Cage
Image Source

If you have a multi-dog household, you might want to consider using stackable dog crates. Stackable crates come in various forms and can be used to hold several dogs, saving you lots of space in your home.

How Many Doors?

Some kinds of crates come with multiple doors. Each type of crate has pros and cons.

For example, a single-door, collapsible crate is an affordable choice if you have a suitable place to put the crate that only needs one entry point. However, if your chosen crate spot demands a side door configuration, a double door is a better choice.

If you’re crate training a puppy, a multiple-door crate is probably the best choice for you.

Chewers

Puppies and serial chewers need a sturdy dog crate that nibbling teeth won’t damage.

Soft-sided, fabric types of crates are no use for chewers, as the material is too flimsy and easily damaged. Wooden furniture crates are also an unsuitable choice for dogs that chew. Although the dog might not be able to escape from the crate, it will do a lot of damage to the crate. Chewers are best suited by a heavy-duty crate that’s made to withstand the effects of chewing.

You can sometimes distract a chewer by providing your dog with a chew toy, or some long-lasting chew treats to keep him busy and reduce the amount of destructive chewing he does. Choosing the right size of crate also helps to discourage a dog from chewing the crate sides.

Ventilation

puppy in crate

When your dog is confined to his crate, it’s crucial that he has plenty of ventilation and a steady airflow through his crate.

Dogs can overheat very easily, especially in hot or humid conditions. So, always check that your chosen crate design has plenty of air holes or mesh for good ventilation. That’s especially important for flat-faced dog breeds, such as Bulldogs and Pugs, that can struggle to breathe if the airflow in their crate is not adequate.

Although a crate cover can help create a cozy, den-like atmosphere for your dog, you need to be careful not to prevent air from circulating through the crate. Always leave at least one side of the crate open to the air.

Storability

Most wire crates and soft-sided crates are simple to collapse and fold down. In contrast, furniture crates are not foldable, and plastic crates can be fiddly to break down, too. Also, many heavy-duty dog crates are cumbersome and heavy, making collapsing one a two-man job.

When choosing a crate for your dog, remember to take into consideration what extra space you have available for the crate when it’s not in use, and choose something suitable.

Time In Crate

The length of time you expect your dog to spend in the crate will also influence the size and type of crate you buy. 

For example, if you want to leave your dog at home in his crate for the day while you’re out at work, you’ll want a secure, well-ventilated crate that will keep your dog safely confined while allowing him space to move around. In that case, a popular crate choice for pet parents is a wire crate.

On the other hand, if you only want to crate your dog for very short periods while you run a few errands, a soft-side or plastic crate will most likely be suitable. 

What Are The Different Types of Dog Crates

The type of crate you choose will depend on the crate’s purpose, the size of your dog, your dog’s temperament, and the length of time you expect your dog to spend confined to his crate.

Metal Wire Dog Crates

Dog inside a wire crate

Metal wire crates are made from durable metal and have lots of benefits, including:

  • Metal wire crates are pretty durable crates that are perfect for chewers since they cannot inflict too much damage on the crate.
  • Metal crates come in lots of different sizes to accommodate dog breeds, from tiny terriers to massive Mastiffs.
  • These crates provide your dog with excellent visibility while allowing you to keep an eye on your pet, too. That can be helpful for pups that suffer from separation anxiety, as they can still feel part of your family even while confined to their crate.
  • Metal crates provide lots of air circulation, making them ideal for use in warm weather.
  • Wire metal crates do not tend to harbor odors, helping to keep your home free from doggy smells.
  • Metal crates are usually collapsible for space-saving and easy portability.
  • Metal wire crates are a helpful training tool for puppies and adult dogs alike.
  • Metal crates usually come with a removable plastic tray for easy cleanup in the event of accidents.

On the downside, some heavy-duty, extra-large wire crates are heavy and awkward to move around single-handedly. Also, cheaper wire crates may rust over time and require replacement.

Soft-Sided Crates

A collapsible soft-sided dog crate is made from fabric material, usually with mesh windows and doors for good ventilation. 

You can buy soft-sided crates in lots of different sizes and styles, including purse and backpack designs, which makes these versatile crates a popular choice with dog owners. Generally, fabric crates are suitable for airline travel if you have a small dog that can stay with you in the airplane passenger cabin. Soft-sided crates are lightweight and easy to carry around and collapse for excellent portability and storage.

As an added plus, most dogs love this kind of crate. 

On the downside, soft material crates are not suitable for chewers and can be difficult to clean. That said, some material crates are machine-washable, so check before you order one.

Plastic Dog Crates

Pug dog leaving a plastic crate

Plastic dog crates are pretty sturdy compared with soft-sided fabric crates, and they provide your dog with more privacy than wire crates.

Most plastic dog crates are accepted by airlines, which is an important consideration if you plan on traveling abroad with your dog. You can usually hose down a plastic crate to clean it. The enclosed design of plastic crates can provide your dog with the feeling of a cozy den. Finally, plastic crates are not easily damaged by chewers.

The main downside to a plastic dog crate is that it is bulky and takes up a lot of storage space. Although easy to clean, plastic tends to absorb odors, and eventually, a plastic crate will have a clinging doggy smell that’s extremely difficult to get rid of.

Also, plastic dog crates generally have inadequate ventilation and don’t provide your dog with much space to move around, so you can’t leave your dog confined to one for long.

Wooden Furniture Crates

Wooden and rattan material furniture crates are extremely popular, especially with those who don’t want to use the crate for traveling with their pet. These crates are perfect for homes where space is at a premium and can make a very attractive addition to your living space.

Furniture crates come in a wide range of different styles, designs, and sizes that you can use as functional items, such as end tables, media consoles, and side tables. You can even have furniture crates custom-made to fit perfectly with your home decor scheme.

The main downside of wooden crates is that they are unwieldy to move around due to their weight. So, once the crate is in position, that’s where it stays! Also, wooden crates can be vulnerable to scratching claws and damage by chewers.

If your dog has an accident in a wooden crate, cleaning it can be challenging. Wood and rattan tends to absorb odors, potentially leaving you with a smelly, doggy atmosphere in your living room, which is not pleasant.

Combination Dog Crates

Fancy Corner Dog Crate
Image Source: Foter.com

Combo crates are usually an amalgamation of metal with plastic or metal with wood.

Usually, combination crates have wheels on the bottom for easy portability, and they usually have multiple access doors for hassle-free access.

The main drawback to this kind of crate is that they are very heavy to carry and move around. Some combination crates have a removable tray for cleaning, but many don’t. The wooden part of the crate can be susceptible to damage from chewers.

Read our guide on crate tray sizes here.

Are Crate Toys A Good Idea?

Providing your dog with a few toys to keep him amused while in his crate is an important part of crate training.

While your dog is busy playing with an interactive toy, he won’t be figuring out how to escape, and he’ll be less likely to resort to chewing his crate or crate bed out of frustration. Playing with toys is mentally tiring for a dog, and that can help an anxious dog to relax and settle better when crated.

When choosing toys for your dog’s crate, always go for toys that can’t present a choking hazard. For example, plushy toys can easily be ripped, and the dog could choke on the stuffing. Likewise, toys that contain squeakers should be avoided for the same reason. 

Instead, pick a robust chew toy, such as a KONG. Stuff the toy with peanut butter or treats and freeze it. Your dog will be kept busy for hours trying to get the tasty reward out of the toy, and the cool toy can be soothing for a dog that’s teething.

Does My Dog Need A Crate Bed?

Comfy Pooch Bed
 Image Source: Instructables.com

Your dog’s crate is also his comfortable den, so a cozy bed or mat is going to add to the comfortable environment. Most young puppies appreciate a comfy bed to snuggle into, but some older dogs will rip up the bed and destroy it.

You can buy a crate bed for a chewer, provided that you choose a chew-resistant product that can’t be easily destroyed. It’s also advisable to choose a bed that has a washable cover for young puppies and senior dogs that might have an accident in their crate.

If you have an older dog with mobility problems or arthritic joints, choose an orthopedic crate bed that gives your furry friend the support he needs to be comfortable.

Is Crate Training Important?

As discussed earlier, there are many benefits to using crates for both dogs and owners!

But correctly crate training your dog is crucial if your dog is going to be happy and relaxed in his crate. In many ways, crate training a puppy is easier than crate training an adult dog. Puppies are like little fluffy sponges, soaking up new experiences and learning to do new things, including spending time in a crate.

Older dogs, especially those from rescue centers and shelters, tend to take longer to crate train. However, it’s worth persevering, as there are so many benefits to be had from crating your dog.

Never simply shut your dog in his crate and leave him there while you go out! That approach is sure to stress your pet and completely turn him off using his crate. Instead, use positive reinforcement methods to encourage your dog to enjoy spending time in his crate, whether you’re in the house or not.

Final Thoughts

Did you enjoy our guide to choosing the correct size dog crate for your canine companion? If you found the article interesting and helpful, please take a moment to share it.

A comfortable dog crate must be the right size for your dog. If the crate is too small, your dog won’t be able to lay down and relax. But if the crate is too big, the environment won’t be cozy and den-like, and your dog might be tempted to use one end of the crate as a potty area.

What type of crate did you choose for your dog? Why did you go for that particular dog crat style? Tell us in the comments box below.

Meet our writer

Alison Page was brought up with dogs and various other pets! For a few years, Alison worked as a Practice Manager in a small animal veterinary clinic. Alison is now a full-time writer, specializing in creating articles on the care and training of dogs, cats, and fish.

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