Labradoodle Generations – F1, F1B, F2, F2B, & F3

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If you have your heart set on buying a Labradoodle, you’ll have noticed that these dogs are often referred to using letters and numbers.

But what’s the difference between an F1BB Labradoodle, an F3 Labradoodle, and an F3B Labradoodle? Are F2BB and F2B, etc., dogs different types of Labradoodles? And what on earth is a multigenerational Labradoodle?

This guide includes a comprehensive explanation of all those confusing letters and numbers, and there’s a handy generation chart for you to refer to.

Labradoodle Generations Explained 

Once you’ve grasped what those numbers and letters mean, it’s pretty easy to understand the various Labradoodle generations.

For example, let’s take the F1B Labradoodle.

  • The letter “F” represents a filial hybrid. That means that the dog is a crossbreed rather than a purebred. 
  • So, because all Labradoodles are produced by crossing a Poodle with a Labrador retriever, every generation will begin with the letter “F.”
  • The number “1” represents the generation number of the dog. Here, the number “1” represents the first-generation Labradoodle. That means the dog is the first generation produced by mating a Labrador retriever with a Poodle.
  • The letter “B” represents the word backcross. Backcross means inbreeding back to a purebred animal. In the case of Labradoodles, inbreeding refers to using a purebred Poodle to produce a dog that doesn’t shed much.
  • Therefore, an F1B Labradoodle is a cross between an F1 Labradoodle and a purebred Poodle.

Generally, people choose a Doodle generation with more Poodle DNA because that mix is typically light shedding and more hypoallergenic than a purebred Labrador retriever. 

Hypoallergenic Qualities

Labradoodle

Almost always, a Labradoodle is backcrossed with a Poodle to produce light shedding puppies and is viewed by many as hypoallergenic.

Occasionally, a breeder might backcross using a purebred Labrador retriever, although that is unusual. So, always ask the breeder for confirmation.

When it comes to Labradoodle prices, puppies with the most Poodle genetics are the most expensive. That’s because people want a dog that doesn’t shed much and also has that desirable, cute teddy bear look.

Labradoodle Generations Quick Reference Chart

The following at-a-glance reference chart explains the numbers and letters used to describe Labradoodle generations.

Generation

Generation

Generation

Generation

Generation

Generation

Generation

Generation

Most Common Pairing

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Estimated DNA Percentages

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 1

Parent 2

Parent 2

Parent 2

Parent 2

Parent 2

Parent 2

Parent 2

Parent 2

Poodle

Poodle

Poodle

Poodle

Poodle

Poodle

Poodle

Poodle

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

Labrador retriever

F1 Labradoodle

Labrador retriever

Poodle

50%

50%

F1B Labradoodle

F1 Labradoodle

Poodle

75%

25%

F1BB Labradoodle

F1B Labradoodle

Poodle

87.5%

12.5%

F2 Labradoodle

F1 Labradoodle

F1 Labradoodle

50%

50%

F2B Labradoodle

F2 Labradoodle

Poodle

62.5%

37.5%

F2BB Labradoodle

F2B Labradoodle

Poodle

81.25%

18.75%

F3 Labradoodle

F2 Labradoodle

F2 Labradoodle

50%

50%

Multigen Labradoodle

Varies

Varies

Varies

Varies

Labradoodle Generations In More Detail

Now, let’s take a closer look at the various Labradoodle generations in coat types, temperament, and size to give you a clearer idea of what generation would best suit your lifestyle.

F1 Labradoodle

Labradoodle on Champagne Background

An F1 Labradoodle (50% Labrador Retriever and 50% Poodle) is a cross between a purebred Labrador retriever and a purebred Standard Poodle. The puppies from this crossbreed will take half of each parent’s genetic makeup.

Although that sounds pretty straightforward, that cross can be difficult to predict how the puppies will turn out. For example, some puppies might take more after the Poodle parent than the Labrador retriever parent, and vice versa. 

That means some F1 Labradoodle puppies can have very curly coats that barely shed, whereas others might have flat, smooth coats that shed quite a bit. Other pups can have wavy coats. 

Interestingly, with the exception of coat color and type, the puppies’ physical characteristics and temperaments are generally very similar.

Hybrid Vigor

F1 Labradoodles inherit what’s called hybrid vigor. Hybrid vigor is a health advantage that implies that an F1 Doodle will be healthier than a purebred dog breed.

How so?

Well, inbreeding between purebred dogs often causes the same hereditary health conditions and conformational deformities in each generation. However, if you cross two different dog breeds, they will acquire fewer congenital health problems; therefore, the puppies will be healthier and more robust than purebred dogs.

Also, hybrid dogs generally have a longer lifespan than purebreds, meaning that you get to enjoy more years of fun with your canine companion.

Generation

Coat Type

Hypoallergenic

Labradoodle Sizes

Adult Weight

Adult Height

Labradoodle Sizes

Shedding

Hybrid Vigor

Adult Weight

Adult Height

Age at Maturity

Age at Maturity

F1

Straight, wavy, or curly

Varies

Varies

Yes

F1B

Wavy or curly

Yes, mostly

Mostly non-shedding

Moderate

F1BB

Curly

Yes

Mostly non-shedding

Moderate

F2

Variable – straight, curly, or wavy

Unpredictable

Unpredictable

Yes, but less so than F1

F2B

Curly or wavy

Probably

Probably

Yes, but less than F1

F2BB

Curly

Yes

Yes

Yes, but less than F1

F3

Wavy or curly

Probably

Yes

Moderate

Multigen

Curly

Yes

Yes

No

F1B Labradoodle

Labradoodle Dog sitting

The F1B Labradoodle (25% Labrador Retriever and 75% Poodle) is a hybrid between an F1 Labradoodle and a purebred Poodle or Labrador retriever. However, usually, a purebred Poodle is used to create an F1B Doodle simply because of the Poodle’s non-shedding qualities.

An F1B Labradoodle is a backcross and is the most common generation of Doodle that breeders produce. That’s because this cross is a relatively simple combination of first-generation dogs.

F1B Labradoodles are very popular because they typically take more of the coat type of the Poodle parent. That makes F1B dogs lighter shedders, making them a good choice for families with pet allergy sufferers.  

On the downside, F1Bs need plenty of daily brushing to remove mats and tangles that form in their curly coat. Many F1B Labradoodle owners have their dogs clipped or shaved every four to six weeks simply to make it easier to keep their dog’s coat in good condition.

Hybrid Vigor

F1B generation Labradoodles still have a few hybrid vigor health advantages. However, it should be noted that those qualities diminish with each generation of crossbreed dogs.

F1BB Labradoodle

Fleece Coated Labradoodle

F1BB Labradoodles (87.5% Poodle and 12.5% Labrador retriever) are created by crossing an F1B Labradoodle and a purebred Poodle or purebred Labrador retriever. The F1BB is a second backcross with a purebred Poodle, hence the second “B” in the generational reference.

However, most breeders use a purebred Poodle in this cross since the Poodle has more hypoallergenic qualities than the Labrador retriever and barely sheds.

The F1BB Labradoodle is the lightest shedding and most hypoallergenic of all the first-generation Doodles, thanks to a large amount of Poodle DNA it inherits. That makes F1BB Labradoodles an excellent choice for allergy sufferers or those that don’t want to spend hours vacuuming up dog hair!

However, F1BB dogs generally have a curlier coat or wavy coat that needs daily brushing to keep it in good condition and free from mats. You’ll also need to have your dog clipped every four to six weeks to keep the coat manageable.

Hybrid Vigor

F1BB Labradoodles are third-generation hybrids. For that reason, these dogs typically have fewer hybrid vigor characteristics than F1 and F1B animals.

F1BB Doodles are often classified and viewed as multigenerational or multigen Labradoodles since they are more than second-generation dogs.

F2 Labradoodle

Labradoodle Designer Dog 1

The F2 Labradoodle (50% Poodle and 50% Labrador retriever) is a second-generation crossbreed¬†¬†Labradoodle¬†that’s produced by crossing two F1 Labradoodles.

F2 generation Labradoodles typically produce a huge range of Doodle characteristics that are extremely similar to that of the F1 Labradoodle. That’s because the degree of parent dog genetic makeup is very similar, making it almost impossible to tell which genes will be dominant.

Most reputable Labradoodle breeders won’t produce F2 Labradoodles because of the huge potential variance in coat type, coat color, and shedding. However, if you do decide to get an F2 Labradoodle, you should know that these dogs can have a straight, wavy, or curly coat that can be shedding or non-shedding.

In summary, there are no guarantees for pet owners who decide to buy an F2 Labradoodle!

F2B Labradoodle

Labradoodle walking outdoor

The F2B Labradoodle (37.5% Labrador Retriever and 62.5% Poodle) is produced by crossing an F1 Labradoodle (50% purebred Poodle and 50% purebred Labrador Retriever) and an F1B Labradoodle, which is 75% Poodle and 25% Labrador Retriever.

The resulting hybrid is roughly 37.5% Labrador Retriever and 62.5% Poodle.

That said, some breeders use an F1B Labradoodle and cross it with another F1B Labradoodle, creating an F2B dog that’s around 75% Poodle and 25% Labrador retriever. That’s a less common mixture, so it’s worth asking the breeder for specifics.

F2B Labradoodles have a significant quantity of Poodle genetic material in their makeup that typically results in the dog having a wavy or curly coat that doesn’t shed much. That said, it’s difficult to predict exactly how an F2B puppy will turn out as an adult, which is part of the charm and appeal of the breed.

F2B Labradoodles are sometimes referred to as multigen dogs because they are third-generation dogs.

F2BB Labradoodle

Australian labradoodle in nature

The F2BB Labradoodle (18.75% Labrador Retriever and 81.25% Poodle) is a hybrid produced by crossing an F2B Labradoodle, which is 62.5% Poodle, 37.5% Labrador Retriever, with a purebred Poodle.

That creates a second backcross with the purebred Poodle and elements of the second generation; hence the dog is given the second letter “B” in its name.

F2BB Labradoodles are the lightest shedders and most hypoallergenic of the second-generation Labradoodles since they have 81.25% Poodle genetics. However, if you want a dog that has more Poodle DNA, you should look for an F1BB Labradoodle that is 87.5% Poodle and 12.5% Labrador Retriever.

F2BB Doodles typically have extremely curly coats that require daily brushing and regular clipping to keep them manageable and looking smart. That said, if you have pet allergies or you’re looking for a dog that won’t shed hair all over your clothes, floor, and car upholstery, the F2BB could be the ideal choice for you.

The F2BB generation is sometimes referred to as multigen Labradoodles as these dogs are technically the fourth generation of Doodle. However, most breeders still refer to these pups as F2BB Labradoodles.

F3 Labradoodles

Close Up Shot of a white Labradoodle

F3 Labradoodles are usually referred to as multigenerational or multi-gen Labradoodles and are the third era or more of the Doodle generation dynasty.

Usually, an F3 Labradoodle is produced by crossing two F1B generation Labradoodles. However, you could cross an F3 Labradoodle with an F2 generation dog to produce another F2 Labradoodle.

F3 Labradoodles generally carry a large percentage of Poodle qualities, making them a good choice for those with pet allergies. An F3 Doodle’s coat can be wavy or curly, and these dogs are generally light shedders.

Multigen Labradoodles

The term multigenerational, multigen, or multi-gen Labradoodles refers to any dog past the second generation.

That covers many Labradoodle generations, including F1BB, F2B, and F2BB Labradoodles. When you’re searching for a Labradoodle puppy, you’ll notice that many breeders list multigen Doodles rather than posting the specific generation. 

To be sure what types of generation cross the breeder is producing, ask for more information. That can give you a clearer idea of what actual coat hair your puppy will develop as he matures.

Why Do Labradoodle Generations Matter?

Holiday Labradoodles

When talking about generations, we’re referring to the dog’s ancestry and the DNA the pup inherits from its parents and grandparents. 

Genetics plays a role in determining the physical characteristics and temperament of a dog, as well as influencing what potential health problems your dog might be at risk of developing.

Although a responsible breeder can have their puppies’ parents health-screened to detect any potential problems, there’s never a guarantee that the pups won’t inherit a congenital health condition.

FAQs

Here are some of the most commonly asked questions posed by people who are considering taking on one of these gorgeous dogs.

If you don’t find the information you’re searching for, shoot us a message via the comments box below, and we’ll do our best to help you.

What’s The Most Expensive Labradoodle Generation?

Crop payroll clerk counting money while sitting at table

You might be surprised to learn that the price of Labradoodles varies quite a bit, depending on what generation of dog you want to buy. 

F1 Labradoodle Price

F1 Labradoodles are generally the cheapest. That said, prices vary depending on the breeder’s reputation, your location, and the size and color of the dog.

You can expect to pay between $1,200 and $3,000 for an F1 Labradoodle, with the smaller types being the most expensive. Puppies with a flat coat are usually less costly than those with curly or wavy coats.

Interestingly, F1 Labradoodles are the generation most often found in shelters and rescues. So, if you’re not too worried about the type of coat your Doodle has, you might want to offer a preloved Doodle a forever home. 

F1B Labradoodle Price

F1B Labradoodles are more popular with allergy sufferers than F1 dogs, and for that reason, F1B dogs are typically more expensive. 

Although prices vary depending on the factors mentioned above, you can expect to pay from $1,500 and $5,000 for a well-bred puppy. Again, smaller dogs are usually more expensive than Standard Labradoodles.

F1BB Labradoodle Price

Cost word after a stack of coins

The demand for F1BB generation Labradors has pushed up their price, and you can expect to pay between $1,500 and $5,000 for a good quality puppy from a reputable breeder.

F2 Labradoodle Price

F2 Labradoodle puppies are often less pricey simply because they are not one of the most popular generations. The F2 generation traits are somewhat unpredictable, keeping demand and price down.

Prices vary from $1,200 and $3,000, with Mini and Toy Labradoodles being at the higher end of that range.

F2B Labradoodle Price

F2B Labradoodles have a more predictable coat type, and that makes them more desirable. If you want an F2B Toy or Mini Labradoodle with a curly coat type, you can expect to pay between $1,500 and $5,000.

F2BB Labradoodle Price

F2BB dogs are less often seen than some of the other generations. For that reason, F2BB puppies are usually pricier. 

Expect to pay around $1500 to $5,000 for an F2BB Labradoodle puppy, assuming you can find one!

F3 Labradoodle Price

Again, F3 Labradoodles are not commonly found, but they are not in high demand either. Prices can vary widely from $1,200 to $5,000 depending on the dog’s size, color, breeder reputation, and your location.

Multigen Labradoodle Price

Since the multigenerational label encompasses several different Labradoodle generations, prices for these pups tend to vary widely. 

In general, you’ll pay between $1,200 and $5,000, depending on the size, color, coat type, and breeder reputation.

Which is Best, the F1 or F2 Labradoodle?

There are a few considerations to bear in mind when deciding on whether to go for an F1 or F2-generation Doodle.

  • F1 Labradoodles tend to have higher hybrid vigor, making these pups healthier and less likely to inherit genetic abnormalities and congenital diseases.
  • Although an F1 Labradoodle is 50% Poodle and 50% Labrador retriever, there’s no guarantee which coat type your puppy will favor. Generally, F1 generation dogs are less likely to have a non-shedding coat than multigen animals.
  • F2 generation Labradoodles are less predictable than F1 dogs when it comes to coat types, making it impossible to tell what coat type, hair, and shedding habits your puppy will have. So, a multigenerational pup might be a better choice if you want a dog with a hypoallergenic coat.
  • Many reputable breeders decide not to crossbreed two F2 Doodles because of the unpredictable nature of the outcome. In fact, most opt to breed only F1 dogs. Therefore, it’s usually easier to find an F1 puppy than an F2.

All things considered, we think that an F1 Labradoodle is the better option.

What Makes F1 Labradoodles Good Dogs?

F1 Labradoodles are wonderful dogs!

These pups have a warm, loving personality, and they usually get along well with children and other pets. However, like their Labrador retriever parent, these dogs can be somewhat wary and aloof when meeting strangers for the first time.

F1 Labradoodles are often trained as therapy dogs for those with mental health problems and physical disabilities, including as hearing and seeing dogs. 

F1 Labradoodle Health

As mentioned previously, F1 Doodles have good hybrid vigor, making it less likely that your dog will suffer from congenital health conditions. 

However, you still need to be aware that certain health problems that affect both Poodles and Labradoodles can be a problem in Labradoodles. To avoid those complications, always buy your puppy from a reputable breeder who can provide you with health-screening certification for both the parent dogs.

That said, you can expect to enjoy up to 15 years of fun, devotion, and love from your Labradoodle, provided that you give your pet a correct, balanced diet and lots of exercises.

Unpredictable Traits

Labradoodle Lifespan

Although most F1 Labradoodles are very similar in personality, they can vary tremendously in looks and coat types. The F1’s coat traits can be straight, wavy, or curly, depending on which parent breed the dog most takes after. If your puppy turns out to have a straight coat, you’ll find that he sheds quite a bit.

So, if you want a non-shedding dog, the F1 Labradoodle might not be the best option. That said, if the breeder has used the same parent dogs to produce several litters of F1 puppies, they might be able to offer more information about how the pups will most likely turn out.

What’s The Best Labradoodle Generation For Allergies?

First of all, you need to understand that there’s no such thing as a dog that doesn’t trigger pet allergies in sufferers.

Light shedding Doodles of all varieties are widely touted as being hypoallergenic and a good choice for people with allergies. To an extent, that’s true. However, it’s not the shed fur that causes the allergic reaction. The cause of allergies is the pet dander that’s trapped in the dog’s coat, not simply the shed hair.

That said, dogs that shed very little tend to drop less dander, so they can be said to be hypoallergenic. In other words, these pups are less likely to cause severe allergic reactions than dogs that are heavy shedders.

Of the Labradoodle generations, the F1B, F1BB, F2B, and F2BB generations are likely to be the lightest shedders and are usually the best choices for allergy sufferers.

Grooming Commitment

Curly Hair Cuts scaled e1643287851907

However, those curly coats that don’t shed much might be a blessing for owners with allergies, but they still need a lot of regular brushing and grooming to prevent the fur from matting and tangling. If the dog’s coat becomes matted, skin problems can result.

Do Different Labradoodle Generations Have Different Temperaments?

Although there might be a few exceptions, most Labradoodles are known as friendly, sociable, trainable dogs. These pups make excellent family pets, being loving and loyal, and getting along well with other pets and kids. 

Labradoodles tend to be quite energetic and playful, so you need to spend time training your Labradoodle to remain calm in certain situations. You also need to have plenty of time for walking your dog, playing with him in your backyard, or taking him to the dog park. If these dogs don’t get the exercise they need, destructive behaviors and excessive barking can develop. 

Luckily, Doodles are very intelligent and trainable, so you can easily teach your Labradoodle the desired behaviors you want.

Remember that every dog is an individual with its own personality and temperament. How your puppy turns out will also depend on how well he is trained and socialized in his formative weeks, months, and years. The environment your pup is raised in will also massively influence how he develops.

Final Thoughts

Did you enjoy our guide to Labradoodle generations F1, F1B, F2, F2B, and F3? If you found the information helpful and interesting, please take a moment to share the article.

Not all Labradoodles are made equal! Although most Doodles have the same lively, loyal, friendly personalities, they vary widely in terms of coat type and hybrid vigor. A multigene Labradoodle puppy can be the best pick for allergy sufferers and could also avoid many of the congenital deformities and health problems that often afflict the purebred parent breeds.

What generation is your Labradoodle? Why did you choose him? Tell us about your furry friend in the comments box below.

Meet our writer

Alison Page was brought up with dogs and various other pets! For a few years, Alison worked as a Practice Manager in a small animal veterinary clinic. Alison is now a full-time writer, specializing in creating articles on the care and training of dogs, cats, and fish.

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