English Goldendoodle vs American Goldendoodle – Know The Difference

English Goldendoodle vs. American Goldendoodle – what’s the difference? Are English Goldendoodle puppies more expensive? Which of the two breeds is the healthiest Doodle? And is an F1 or F1B generation the best choice?

If you’re about to begin searching for a Goldendoodle puppy to welcome into your family, you need to know the similarities and differences between these two Goldendoodles.

Read this comprehensive guide for the full lowdown on the English Goldendoodle vs. the American Goldendoodle.

English Goldendoodle vs. American Goldendoodle – What’s The Difference?

Both these Goldendoodles are Poodle mixes that are bred by crossing a purebred Golden retriever with a purebred Poodle.

An English Goldendoodle is produced using an English Cream Golden retriever, whereas an American Goldendoodle is created using an American Golden retriever.

English Goldendoodles are generally a pale golden color or cream color and are somewhat chunkier in build than American Goldendoodles. American Goldendoodles have a darker coat and are available in more shades and colors.

English Goldendoodle vs. American Goldendoodle – Parent Breed Comparison

So, both these dogs have a Poodle parent and a Golden retriever parent, and the main difference between the two is therefore attributed to the Golden retriever parentage.

The Poodle

Poodle swimming

All Goldendoodles have a purebred Poodle as a parent. 

Poodles are associated with France, although it’s thought that they are actually originally a German breed.

Like the Golden retriever, the Poodle was bred as a working dog that was trained to retrieve shot game birds from the water.  However, modern Poodles are more usually kept as companion dogs.

There are generally three sizes of Poodles that the AKC recognizes:

  • Toy
  • Miniature
  • Standard size

Poodles come in a wide range of colors, too, which are reflected in the color of the Goldendoodle.

The English Cream Golden Retriever

young white golden retriever stand waiting on the seafront

The English Cream Golden retriever is also known as the White Golden retriever. 

Interestingly, this version of the famous Golden is not acknowledged as a separate breed by the American Kennel Club. However, the English Cream Golden retriever is recognized by the UK and Canadian Kennel Clubs.

History Of The Breed

English Cream Golden retrievers are thought to be descended from a breed of Russian tracker dogs that’s long since disappeared. However, back in the mid-1800s, Baron Tweedmouth of the Dudley Marjoribanks estate in Scotland created the modern Golden retriever that we know and love today. 

Goldens, as the breed is affectionately known, were bred and trained specifically as bird dogs, accompanying duck hunters and shooting parties hunting upland game birds. The dog’s job was to find and retrieve shot birds from water and marshy areas in the wilds of the Scottish mountains.

Built For The Job

The golden retriever on the grass

The Golden retriever was bred with a flat, double coat to cope with the freezing, harsh weather conditions of their working environment. The outer layer of guard hairs is water and UV repellent, protecting the dog from the elements, while the soft fluffy undercoat acts as insulation that keeps the animal warm in winter and cool in summer.

Golden retrievers have what’s termed a “soft mouth.” That means the dogs can carry the hunter’s prey without damaging it.

Originally, the retriever’s working environment would have been very challenging. The dogs would often be required to spend a whole day traveling across very harsh, rugged terrain in the mountains, as well as swimming, often in freezing water. So, the Golden retriever is a strong, powerful breed with endless stamina.

What Is An American Golden Retriever?

portrait of golden retriever dog

The Golden retriever found its way to the US and Canada, where the AKC officially recognized the breed in 1925. 

Here, a few small differences in the breeding process caused variations in the two breeds.

Comparison of English Goldendoodles and American Goldendoodles

Here’s an at-a-glance overview of the English and American Goldendoodle:

Breed Summary Table

Features

English Goldendoodle

American Goldendoodle

Goldendoodle Barking Featured Image
Goldendoodle brown puppy at home

Height:

Small: 12” to 15” tall
Medium: 16” to 19” tall
Large: 19” to 25” tall

Small: 12” to 15” tall
Medium: 16” to 19” tall
Large: 19” to 25” tall

Weight:

Small: 18 to 30 pounds
Medium: 30 to 50 pounds
Standard: 50 to 85 pounds

Small: 18 to 30 pounds
Medium: 30 to 50 pounds
Standard: 50 to 85 pounds

Color:

Generally paler in color than American Goldendoodles

Darker shades and more variety than English Goldendoodles

Coat:

Can be curly, straight, or wavy

Can be curly, straight, or wavy

Lifespan:

10 to 15 years

10 to 15 years

Health:

PRA, Hip dysplasia, Cancer, Skin conditions, Epilepsy Patellar luxation, cataracts.

PRA, Hip dysplasia, Cancer, Skin conditions, Epilepsy Patellar luxation, cataracts.

Intelligence:

High

High

Temperament:

Friendly, loyal, trainable, and eager to please

Friendly, loyal, trainable, and eager to please

Exercise requirement:

Needs at least one hour of exercise daily

Needs at least one hour of exercise daily

Price:

Around $3,500

From $2,000

English Goldendoodle

Goldendoodle Barking Featured Image

Height:
Small: 12” to 15” tall
Medium: 16” to 19” tall
Large: 19” to 25” tall

Weight:
Small: 18 to 30 pounds
Medium: 30 to 50 pounds
Standard: 50 to 85 pounds

Color:
Generally paler in color than American Goldendoodles

Coat:
Can be curly, straight, or wavy

Lifespan:
10 to 15 years

Health:
PRA, Hip dysplasia, Cancer, Skin conditions, Epilepsy Patellar luxation, cataracts.

Intelligence:
High

Temperament:
Friendly, loyal, trainable, and eager to please

Exercise requirement:
Needs at least one hour of exercise daily

Price:
Around $3,500

American Goldendoodle

Goldendoodle brown puppy at home

Height:
Small: 12” to 15” tall
Medium: 16” to 19” tall
Large: 19” to 25” tall

Weight:
Small: 18 to 30 pounds
Medium: 30 to 50 pounds
Standard: 50 to 85 pounds

Color:
Generally paler in color than American Goldendoodles

Coat:
Can be curly, straight, or wavy

Lifespan:
10 to 15 years

Health:
PRA, Hip dysplasia, Cancer, Skin conditions, Epilepsy Patellar luxation, cataracts.

Intelligence:
High

Temperament:
Friendly, loyal, trainable, and eager to please

Exercise requirement:
Needs at least one hour of exercise daily

Price:
From $2,000

English Goldendoodle vs. American Goldendoodle – A Direct Comparison

Here’s a side-by-side comparison of the two breeds.

Appearance

Although they are essentially similar in looks, there are some notable differences between them.

Color

The obvious difference between these two Doodles is that English Doodles are much lighter in color than the American version. That’s because the English Golden retriever generally has a light cream or white coat.

American Golden retrievers are darker in color and can have a black, cream, apricot, golden, white, or red coat. So, if you want a Red Goldendoodle, you’ll need to buy an American Goldendoodle.

However, you should know that the shade of coat as an adult and the puppy coat is often very different. Goldendoodle coat type prediction is notoriously difficult, as is the case with all Poodle mixes!

Build

The English Goldendoodle is usually chunkier and stockier in bone structure with blockier heads, round eyes, and a square body. These dogs also have fluffy coats.

All those features give the English Goldendoodle the appearance of the Teddy Bear that they are so well-known for and which makes them so popular.

Shedding

A common trait with both these dogs is their primary coat types that can be a curly, wavy, or straight type of coat. 

Generally, it’s the generation of Goldendoodles that determines the individual dog’s coat type and the amount of shedding you can expect. A curly coat dog takes more genetic material from their Poodle parent and typically sheds less.

Straight coat Goldendoodles have smooth coats that are more heavily weighted toward the Golden retriever parent and will usually shed moderately.

Hypoallergenic

Allergies are caused by pet dander, not pet hair. That said, the more a dog sheds, the more dander will fall off the dog attached to the shed hair. So, for that reason, a very low-shedding Goldendoodle will usually be more hypoallergenic than one that sheds more.

Therefore, if you have allergy sufferers in your household, a curly-coated Doodle is the way to go.

Brushing And Grooming

Combed dog in grooming salon

Most Goldendoodle owners take their pets to a professional grooming appointment every four to six weeks to have their dog clipped and bathed. That can help to reduce shedding and brushing a shorter coat makes for an easier grooming routine.

Both English and American Goldendoodles have soft coats and tend to shed to the same minimal degree, depending on the puppy’s adult coat type. However, it’s generally accepted that the English Goldendoodle has a thicker coat.

Both these mixed breeds need regular grooming to keep their plush Teddy Bear coats in good condition.

English Goldendoodles vs. American Goldendoodles – Temperament

English Cream Golden retrievers and American Golden retrievers have the same basic excellent temperament: friendly, loyal, and smart. 

Of the two types of Golden retrievers, it’s said by many owners that the English variety is more chilled out and less boisterous. That said, any dog’s behavior is largely down to his socialization, routine, and home environment.

Because of the breed’s working heritage, they are hard-wired to retrieve prey and fetch it back to their handlers without damage. That makes the Goldendoodle highly trainable and eager to please their owners. Also, thanks to the Doodle’s sociable, joyful temperament, they are often used as therapy dogs. 

English Goldendoodles vs. American Goldendoodles – Health Differences

You want to enjoy a long and happy relationship with this lovely breed, so your Goldendoodle’s good health is paramount.

The health of every mixed breed puppy is heavily influenced by that of his parents. In the case of Golden retrievers, it’s thought that American Golden retrievers have a higher rate of cancer than their English counterparts at around 60% compared with just 38.8%.

Also, American Goldens have a shorter life expectancy of around ten years on average compared with the English Golden retriever’s average lifespan of around 12 years. It’s generally assumed that the difference here is due to the stricter health testing procedure in Europe when compared with the US.

Avoid Puppy Mills

Adorable litter of Goldendoodle puppies in a basket

Always buy your Goldendoodle puppy from a reputable, reliable breeder who has their breeding dogs health tested. Although the price of your cute bundle of fluff will undoubtedly be more, never buy a cheap puppy from a puppy mill.

Dogs from these illegal breeders are not health checked, and the puppies often come with congenital health issues and other serious diseases that sometimes prove fatal within a week or so of getting the puppy home.

Size Differences Between American And English Goldendoodles

Whatever variety of Goldendoodle you buy, there are plenty of different sizes to choose from.

Although the basic size of English and American Goldendoodles is roughly the same, the American variety tends to appear less stocky in build. However, that’s generally because the English version’s coat is thicker and fuller. 

Price

English Cream Golden retrievers are pretty rare in the States. For that reason, there are fewer English Goldendoodle puppies for sale, which pushes up the price. 

A few factors influence Goldendoodle prices, including:

  • Size (smaller size dogs are more popular and are, therefore, more expensive)
  • Location of the breeder
  • The quality of the breeding dogs
  • Color (English cream coat and curly coat-style Doodles are very rare and sought after)
  • Coat type (low-shedders are usually more sought after)

You can expect to pay around $3,500 or more for a well-bred English Goldendoodle. An American Goldendoodle will usually be cheaper, retailing from around $2,000.

Differences And Similarities Between American Goldendoodles and English Goldendoodles – Round-Up

These two varieties of Goldendoodles are extremely similar in many ways. That being said, we have noted a few differences between the two.

  • English Goldendoodles are considered to be healthier than American Goldendoodles.
  • English Goldendoodles have a slightly longer lifespan than American Goldendoodles.
  • English Goldendoodles are stockier and chunkier in build than American Goldendoodles.
  • English Goldendoodles have a light cream coat, whereas the American Doodles’ coat is darker.
  • Both varieties are friendly and loyal with a playful temperament, generally getting along well with kids and other pets.
  • Both breeds are highly trainable and eager to please their handlers.
  • Both American Goldendoodles and English Goldendoodles come in the same basic sizes.
  • English Goldendoodles are generally more expensive than American Goldendoodles.
  • Both breeds are energetic and require a lot of daily exercise.

In Conclusion

Happy Goldendoodle Dog With American Flag Bandana

I hope you enjoyed our comparison of American Goldendoodles and English Goldendoodles. Now you can choose your puppy from an informed perspective.

Both these gorgeous dogs are very similar, and they can both make excellent family pets. Both breeds are working dogs that do best when living in a household where outdoor activities are the order of the day. You and your kids can have lots of fun training your Goldendoodle, and these dogs love to be around their human families.

Both English and American Goldendoodles are a fabulous choice for a family dog. But if you’re working to a smaller budget, the American Goldendoodle will cost you less to buy. However, the English Goldendoodle could be healthier and won’t cost you as much in vet’s fees.

What kind of Goldendoodle would you choose?

Tell us in the comments box below, and don’t forget to share this article if you loved it!

Meet our writer

Alison Page was brought up with dogs and various other pets! For a few years, Alison worked as a Practice Manager in a small animal veterinary clinic. Alison is now a full-time writer, specializing in creating articles on the care and training of dogs, cats, and fish.

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