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Goldendoodle Lifespan – How Long Do Goldendoodles Live?

How long do Goldendoodles live?

If you’re considering welcoming a Goldendoodle puppy or a full-grown rescue Doodle into your life, you’ll want to know how many happy years you’ll get to enjoy with your new furry friend. 

So, what is the average Goldendoodle lifespan? Do smaller breeds of Goldendoodles have a longer life expectancy than larger varieties of these popular pups? 

Read this article to find out how long a Goldendoodle can live.

What’s The Average Lifespan Of A Goldendoodle?

Portrait picture of a Goldendoodle outdoors

Like all aspects of this popular breed, the Goldendoodle’s lifespan is influenced by that of the puppy’s parents.

In the case of F1 Goldendoodles, the parent dogs are a Golden Retriever and a Poodle. A Golden Retriever has an average lifespan of between ten and 12 years, whereas a Poodle has a slightly longer life expectancy of 12 to 15 years. 

Although certain health conditions that some dogs develop in old age can come into play when it comes to life expectancy, a standard Goldendoodle’s average life expectancy is generally between ten and 15 years. 

What About Different Sized Goldendoodles?

In most breeds, smaller dogs tend to enjoy a longer life than large ones. But does that apply to Goldendoodles, too?

English Teddy Bear Goldendoodle lying on the floor

Well, that depends on several factors, including genetics.

  1. Poodles live longer than Golden Retrievers. So, the more Poodle genes the puppy has, the longer his life expectancy will be.
  2. Small dogs tend to enjoy a longer life than larger ones.
  3. Multigenerational Goldendoodles don’t have a markedly different lifespan to F1 animals, provided that the base genetic percentage remains the same. 

 Life Expectancy Of Goldendoodles – Summary

Goldendoodle Type

Average Lifespan

Reasoning

Standard Goldendoodle

10 to 15 years

Poodles are longer-lived than Golden retrievers

English Teddy Bear Goldendoodle

10 to 15 years

Poodles are longer-lived than Golden retrievers

American Goldendoodle

10 to 15 years

Poodles are longer-lived than Golden retrievers

Mini Goldendoodle

12 to 15 years

Smaller dogs live longer

F1b Goldendoodle

10 to 16 years

The more Poodle genetics the dog has (75% for F1b Goldendoodles), the longer the lifespan will be

Teacup and Toy Goldendoodles

12 to 16 years

Difficult to assess since many Toy and Teacup Doodles are mixed with a third breed

Goldendoodle Type

Standard Goldendoodle

Average Lifespan

10 to 15 years

Reasoning

Poodles are longer-lived than Golden retrievers

Goldendoodle Type

Average Lifespan

10 to 15 years

Reasoning

Poodles are longer-lived than Golden retrievers

Goldendoodle Type

American Goldendoodle

Average Lifespan

10 to 15 years

Reasoning

Poodles are longer-lived than Golden retrievers

Goldendoodle Type

Mini Goldendoodle

Average Lifespan

12 to 15 years

Reasoning

Smaller dogs live longer

Goldendoodle Type

F1b Goldendoodle

Average Lifespan

10 to 16 years

Reasoning

The more Poodle genetics the dog has (75% for F1b Goldendoodles), the longer the lifespan will be

Goldendoodle Type

Teacup and Toy Goldendoodles

Average Lifespan

12 to 16 years

Reasoning

Difficult to assess since many Toy and Teacup Doodles are mixed with a third breed

Factors That Affect A Goldendoodle’s Lifespan

There are a few variables that can influence how long a Goldendoodle will live.

Genetics And Health Testing

Probably the most influential factor when it comes to a Goldendoodle’s life expectancy is whether or not the breeder carries out health screening and genetic testing on their breeding dogs.

Reputable Goldendoodle breeders always health screen their dogs to make sure that no serious genetic health conditions are present in the dogs’ genes that could be passed on to their offspring. However, backyard breeders and puppy mills often don’t bother to do that, which is one reason their prices are so low. 

So, a puppy with serious genetic abnormalities will most likely not survive as long as a well-bred pup with healthy parents.

Size

wet Miniature goldendoodle looking at the camera.

As you can see from the table above, smaller dogs tend to live longer than large ones. In fact, it’s known that for every 4.4 pounds of body mass, a dog’s lifespan is reduced by one month.

That’s thought to be because large dogs grow more quickly than smaller ones and also tend to succumb to age-related conditions faster. So, a Mini Goldendoodle will typically live for one or two years longer than a Standard Goldendoodle.

Hybrid Vigor

According to the Goldendoodle Association of North America (GANA), the phenomenon of “hybrid vigor” can give a dog a longer lifespan.

How so?

Well, purebred dogs tend to pass on more genetic health issues than crossbreeds. That’s because the introduction of a new bloodline interrupts generational heredity.

That means that the generation of Goldendoodle that you buy will have an impact on the puppy’s life expectancy. Each generation has less and less hybrid vigor, so a first-generation F1 Goldendoodle will typically enjoy a longer life than a multi-generation dog.

Other Lifespan Influencers

There are a few other factors that can influence the lifespan of a Goldendoodle.

  • Annual veterinary health checks can pick up potentially serious health problems early so that they can be treated.
  • A balanced, nutritious diet can help to keep your dog healthy and long-lived.
  • Obesity can cause serious health issues for dogs, including diabetes, heart disease, and painful arthritis. So, it’s essential that you give your Doodle plenty of daily exercise to keep him fit and in good shape.

Common Signs of Aging

When you spend time with your dog every day, it can be easy to miss the signs that he’s getting older. 

Just as with people, the aging process affects dogs in different ways, some of which can be very subtle and easily missed. 

For example, my elderly dog Jess gradually slowed down, her eyesight and hearing deteriorated, and she developed canine dementia. Despite all that, thanks to excellent veterinary care and lots of TLC, Jess enjoyed a happy, contented later life until she finally passed away at the grand old age of 18. Jess was a large crossbreed of indeterminate origins, and her long lifespan astounded even the vet!

Here’s what to expect as your Goldendoodle enters his senior years:

  • Weight increases as your dog uses less energy
  • Less shiny coat and elastic skin
  • Lipomas (fatty lumps) appear on the body
  • Reduced appetite
  • Increased drinking (could indicate liver/kidney problems or diabetes)
  • Doggy breath
  • Weight loss
  • Joint stiffness due to arthritis
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Coughing (possibly due to a leaky heart valve)
  • Incontinence or problems passing feces or urine
  • Disorientation and balance problems 

Generally, dogs that are fit, genetically healthy, fed a correct nutritious diet, and receive regular vet checks take longer to show signs of aging. 

Tips For Looking After An Aging Goldendoodle

As well as advances in modern veterinary medicine, there are some practical ways in which you can help to slow down the aging process and enjoy a few more years with your beloved furry friend.

Weight Watchers!

As an older dog’s metabolism slows down and his body ages, your pet’s nutritional requirements change.

At that stage, a specially formulated senior diet is the best option for your Goldendoodle. Senior diets are typically lower in calories to prevent weight gain, and they are often gentler on your oldie’s tummy, too. Most vet clinics offer free pet weight checks, so you can keep an eye on your pet’s weight and adjust his feeding regimen accordingly.

If you’re not sure what to feed your senior Goldendoodle, ask your vet for advice. 

Manage Joint Problems

Many older dogs develop joint stiffness, especially early in the morning and when the weather is damp and cold.

As joints deteriorate with age and arthritic changes occur, it’s crucial that you keep your dog’s weight controlled. Carefully planned, regular exercise is also essential to help keep the joints from stiffening up. However, avoid random bouts of strenuous exercise, as that will make your dog sore the following day.

Your vet will recommend a suitable joint supplement and possible anti-inflammatory drug therapy to help keep your dog comfortable and mobile.

Regular Dental Checks

Senior dogs often develop dental problems, including cracked or broken teeth, gingivitis, and canine periodontal disease.

As well as being incredibly painful for your dog, these dental conditions can predispose your Goldendoodle to serious blood-borne infections that can damage internal organs, such as the liver and heart.

Your senior dog should have his teeth checked by your vet at least every six months, or immediately if your Doodle develops smelly dog breath, has difficulty eating, or you notice that your pet’s teeth are “chattering.”

Nail Clipping

As part of your regular grooming regimen, make sure that your dog’s nails are kept short. As dogs become less active, their nails can quickly get too long, sometimes growing into the pads.

Regular Vet Checks

Male vet

As well as visits to the vet for annual booster shots, flea treatments, and de-worming, it’s a good idea to take your elderly Goldendoodle for regular health checks.

Of course, if you have any concerns about your dog or you notice any changes in his behavior, no matter how small, it’s sensible to have your pet checked over by a vet. Serious conditions such as cancer and heart failure can affect dogs in later life, but these can be managed if spotted early.

What Can You Do To Help Your Goldendoodle Live A Longer Life?

As mentioned earlier, there’s plenty you can do to help your Goldendoodle enjoy a longer life with you.

Feed Your Dog A Healthy Diet

dog food

Overweight dogs don’t tend to live as long as those whose diet is carefully managed. That’s mainly because obese dogs typically develop life-shortening conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. An overweight dog will often suffer from debilitating joint problems, too.

When choosing food for your Goldendoodle, look for products that contain whole ingredients rather than meat byproducts, sugars, and fillers.

Keep Fit!

Exercise is essential for prolonging your dog’s life and most likely yours too!

Goldendoodle running and biting a ball in his mouth.

A daily walk or play session reduces stress levels, boosts endorphins, and improves mood, which is excellent news for both you and your dog. Regular exercise helps manage your dog’s weight, build strong muscles, and promote a healthy cardiovascular system.

As well as walks with you and your family, take your Goldendoodle to the dog park. Here, your pup can socialize and enjoy a good romp with other dogs, which is excellent for fitness and mood.

If you’re out at work all day, hire a dog walker to exercise your Doodle for you.

Manage Mental Health

As well as physical exercise, dogs need mental stimulation to keep them satisfied and happy. If your Goldendoodle is bored, he can become stressed and depressed, as well as destructive in your home.

You can keep your dog young by keeping his mind occupied with socialization, lots of one-to-one activities, games, and training. Why not try taking your dog to advanced obedience training classes or signing up for a fun dog sport, such as agility?

Clean Your Dog’s Teeth!

As mentioned earlier, poor dentition and bad oral health can seriously impact your dog’s wellbeing and could even shorten his life.

So, get a dog toothbrush and some pet toothpaste, and brush your Doodle’s teeth once every day. Provide your pet with safe chew toys, and be sure to have those gnashers checked regularly by your vet!

Get Your Dog Vet Checked

Your dog’s annual vet visit is essential, even if your pet looks healthy. 

A routine vet exam can highlight potential problems before they become a real issue. A problem spotted early can be treated and resolved, potentially prolonging your dog’s life.

Train Your Dog!

A well-trained, obedient dog is likely to live longer than one that’s unruly. 

How so?

Well, unfortunately, accidents do happen, and a dog that won’t come to recall can easily dash out into traffic with tragic consequences. 

De-sex Your Doodle

Most breeders insist that you have your puppy spayed or neutered. That’s generally to prevent you from deliberately crossbreeding your Doodle with another dog that’s not been health-screened. However, there are other reasons, too.

Most dog parks insist that dogs entering the park are de-sexed. However, accidents happen, and there are far too many unwanted puppies in shelters. 

Pregnancy and birth can take their toll on a female dog, potentially shortening her life. Also, unspayed senior female dogs can suffer from a condition called pyometra, which is often fatal.

Love Your Doodle!

Just like people, dogs need love and attention to thrive. Sometimes, loving your dog can be all it takes to prolong his life simply because your loyal friend cannot bear to leave you.

In Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed this article and found it helpful – please share if you did!

Goldendoodles generally live for between ten and 15 years, although smaller types tend to have a longer lifespan. You can help to maximize your beloved furry friend’s time with you by keeping him fit, feeding a well-balanced, high-quality diet, and taking your pet for regular vet checks.

If you have any questions, please put them in the comments box below. Also, what’s the oldest dog you ever owned? We’d love to know!

Meet our writer

Alison Page was brought up with dogs and various other pets! For a few years, Alison worked as a Practice Manager in a small animal veterinary clinic. Alison is now a full-time writer, specializing in creating articles on the care and training of dogs, cats, and fish.

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