Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle – Which One Is For You

So, you know you want a Doodle! But with so many different types of Doodles to choose from these days, which one is the right fit for you and your family?

In this article, we compare the Aussiedoodle vs. the Goldendoodle. Both breeds are hybrids, sharing a Poodle parent. That shared DNA makes these dogs similar in some ways but they’re quite different in many others.

Read this comprehensive guide to learn the important similarities and differences between an Aussiedoodle and a Goldendoodle so that you can pick the right breed for you.

What Is An Aussiedoodle?

aussiedoodle

The Aussiedoodle or Aussiepoo is sometimes confused with the Australian Goldendoodle, but in fact, these are two different breeds.

An Aussidoodle is a hybrid that’s created by crossing an Australian Shepherd with either a purebred Standard or purebred Miniature Poodle. As you would expect, an Aussiepoodle with a Standard Poodle parent will be larger than one with a Miniature Poodle parent. You can also find multigeneration Aussiepoos where backcrossing is used to create puppies with the most desirable traits, such as light shedding.

Often Aussidoodles are highly intelligent and extremely lively dogs, taking on both those characteristics from their parents.

What Is A Goldendoodle?

F1b Goldendoodle close up image

A Goldendoodle is also a crossbreed dog that has a purebred Poodle as one of its parents. However, the Goldendoodle’s other parent is a purebred Golden retriever.

Poodles of different sizes are used in the various forms of multigeneration Goldendoodles to create different sizes of offspring. So, you can generally find a Goldendoodle of a size to suit your circumstances and preferences from tiny Teacup pups through to large Standard size dogs.

These dogs are generally friendly, loving, and playful, making them extremely popular family pets. However, as is the case with most hybrids, the Goldendoodle’s coat color, fur length, and personality vary widely, even between puppies from the same litter.

Goldendoodles are often backcrossed to produce puppies with very curly, light-shedding coats that are considered to be hypoallergenic. That makes these multigen dogs highly desirable with people who have pet allergies or who simply don’t want to spend time vacuuming up dog hair from their homes. Consequently, multigen Doodles are more expensive to buy than F1 dogs.

Aussiedoodle Vs Goldendoodle Size

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle from Canva

One essential factor to consider when choosing a dog is its adult size. 

Clearly, if you live in a small apartment, you don’t have space to comfortably house a huge 90-pound dog! And if you want a dog to accompany you on all-day hikes, a tiny Teacup Doodle won’t be able to keep up. 

As mentioned above, the size of the offspring is determined by its parents. In the case of Doodles, it’s the Poodle parent that generally influences the size of the puppies. So, when shopping for puppies, always ask the breeder what size the Poodle parent was.

Aussiedoodle Size

Generally, Aussiedoodles are bred to be Miniature or Standard size. But, as this hybrid breed is quite new to the Doodle family, it’s not always straightforward to guess what size the puppies will make when full-grown.

However, Aussiepoos usually range from 10 to 15 inches tall at the shoulder, weighing between 25 to 70 pounds, depending on the variety of the Poodle parent.

Goldendoodle Size

Goldendoodles are a more established Doodle breed, and they are bred in a variety of fairly predictable sizes:

  • Teacup: 8 to 13 inches tall, weighs around 7 pounds
  • Toy: 10 to 16 inches tall, weight 10 to 20 pounds
  • Mini: 13 to 20 inches tall, weight 15 to 35 pounds
  • Medium: 17 to 20 inches tall, 30 to 60 pounds
  • Standard: 21 inches and over tall, weight 50 to 90 pounds

Interestingly, the different types of Goldendoodles mature at different rates, depending on the predicted adult size. Generally, larger Doodles grow more slowly than the smaller breeds.

Which Is Smarter – Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle?

Both Goldendoodles and Aussiedoodles are renowned for their intelligence.

However, of the two breeds, it’s the Aussiedoodle that’s generally regarded as the most intelligent. That’s because both parent breeds are super-bright and very quick to learn.

Temperament

When it comes to temperament and friendly personalities, both these Doodle breeds score highly. 

Both breeds are extremely loyal to their human families, and that can lead to separation anxiety problems if you leave your Doodle alone for long periods. However, on the plus side, Goldendoodles and Aussiepoos typically love kids and get along well with other pets.

However, one thing to bear in mind if you have other pets or little kids is that Aussiedoodles tend to be high-energy dogs have a very strong herding instinct and a stronger personality than the Goldendoodle, which can be problematic if Fido decides to try to herd the family cat! 

Golden retrievers tend to be very laid-back, trustworthy, and calm. So, the Goldendoodle is most likely the best choice for you if you have small children and other pets in your household.

Are Goldendoodles Or Aussiedoodles More Trainable?

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle full grown

Both these breeds are very intelligent and love to please their owners, making them both easy and rewarding to train. That makes basic training a breeze, so you can quickly move on to teaching your dog some simple tricks just for fun.

If you’re into outdoor activities such as boating or hunting, you’ll be pleased to learn that your Doodle can be trained to join you safely and happily on the water or in the field. Also, both breeds need plenty of physical exercise to keep them happy and healthy.

However, the Goldendoodle tends to be more eager and goofy than the Aussiedoodle that’s typically a more focused and thoughtful training partner that needs lots of mental stimulation to keep him happy.

Goldendoodle vs Aussiedoodle Life Expectancy

Generally, the larger the dog breed, the shorter its lifespan. With Doodles, the same can be true, although your dog’s life expectancy is heavily influenced by a range of things, including the dog’s overall health, the quality of the food and care he receives, and how fit he is during his life. 

Aussiedoodles have a lifespan of between 10 and 16 years, whereas Goldendoodles live for between 10 and 15 years. That range is based on both Standard and Mini Doodle varieties, but there are sure to be variations within that.

Goldendoodle vs Aussiedoodle – General Health

Both these Doodles are mixed breed dogs. Typically, crossbreed dogs are healthier and more robust than most purebreds. Purebred dogs are more prone to developing congenital health defects, largely due to too much inbreeding over generations in an attempt to purify certain breeds’ characteristics.

When buying your Doodle puppy, always ask the breeder to show you proof that both the parent dogs have been health-screened for hereditary conditions by a qualified vet. That should minimize the risk of your puppy inheriting serious genetic conditions from his parents and increases his chances of living a healthy life.

That said, watch out for skin allergies, eye diseases, ear infections, heart diseases, and mobility issues in larger, heavier breeds of Doodle, especially if your dog has a very active lifestyle.

Always go to a reputable breeder rather than a backyard breeder who most likely won’t bother to have the parent dogs health-screened.

Coat Type And Color

There is quite a lot of difference between the coat type and color of Goldendoodles and Aussiedoodles.

Goldendoodles

Goldendoodles can have straight, curly, or wavy coats, depending on the generation of the puppy and, therefore, how much Poodle DNA the individual pup has inherited.

Goldendoodles come in a wide variety of colors. They can be black, golden, chocolate, blonde, cream, apricot, and even red. Interestingly, the dog’s coat color can change as it ages, so you can never be sure exactly how your puppy will turn out!

Aussiedoodles

Like the Goldendoodle, the Aussiedoodle can have a curly, wavy, or straight coat, depending on whether the Poodle parent’s genes are dominant. 

Coat colors can be a random mixture of gray, tan, black, and white. You can also find Aussiepoos with a very unusual blue or red merle coloration, sometimes with one blue eye. Although merle color patterns are unusual and beautiful, it’s caused by a genetic mutation.

Also, despite their adorable appearance, dogs with a double merle gene can have serious genetic health defects, so merle puppies are generally best avoided. 

Do Goldendoodles Shed More Than Aussiedoodles?

Generally, the more Poodle influence the puppy has taken, the curlier the coat will be and the less it will shed. For that reason, Doodles with very curly coats are generally considered to be somewhat hypoallergenic. 

If you want a Goldendoodle that doesn’t shed much at all, choose a multigen puppy. F1 puppies are 50% Golden retriever and 50% Poodle and often grow up to have a virtually straight coat if the retriever genes are dominant.

Similarly, Aussiepoos that have wavy or straight coats tend to be medium shedders and are not considered to have a hypoallergenic nature coat. So, if you have mild allergies, choose a multigen Aussiedoodle with plenty of Poodle genes in his parentage if you want a dog that doesn’t shed much.

Aussiedoodle Vs Goldendoodle: Grooming

Female groomer is cutting the hair on the ears.

Both breeds have similar grooming requirements, depending on the coat type of the puppy you buy.

Generally, wavy or straight-coated Doodles require regular brushing every couple of days to remove any loose undercoat that would otherwise end up on your furniture, clothes, and floor coverings. These types of coats shed more than curly coats, meaning that these Doodles are not considered to be hypoallergenic.

Curly-coated Doodles have more of the Poodle parent’s coat genes in their makeup, so they naturally shed less. However, these types need more frequent brushing than their wavy or straight-coated counterparts. That’s because the fluffy undercoat doesn’t shed by itself and quickly becomes matted and tangled if you don’t brush it thoroughly every day. Most owners have their dogs clipped every four to six weeks by a professional groomer, but even so, you still need to give your Doodle a daily brush.

To further complicate matters, your puppy’s coat will most likely change somewhat as he matures, so you never exactly know what you’ll end up with. That’s just one of the charms of these beautiful dogs!

Do Aussiedoodles Bark More Than Goldendoodles?

On average, Goldendoodles are a playful breed and they do tend to bark more than Aussiedoodles, especially if they don’t get adequate exercise. So, if you have a neighbor who isn’t a pet owner, you might be best to go for an Aussiepoo.

Both breeds make average guard dogs, and of the two, the Aussiedoodle is more likely to defend his territory and his owner, whereas the Goldendoodle is less confident in a confrontation situation.

Goldendoodle vs. Aussiedoodle – Which Is More Expensive?

close up picture of a white goldendoodle

At the time of writing, Doodles are incredibly popular dogs. Because of that, these crossbreeds are commanding a very high price. In fact, in some cases, you’ll pay more for an F2B Goldendoodle than you would for a pedigree purebred dog.

So, you can expect to pay upwards of $2,000 for a well-bred, health-screened Goldendoodle puppy. Typically, the more Poodle genes the puppy has, the higher the price will be, as the pup is classed as “hypoallergenic,” and demand is highest for these types of Doodles.

The Aussiedoodle is not as well-known or popular as the Goldendoodle. Consequently, although these are undoubtedly gorgeous dogs and there’s plenty to love about them, they tend to be less expensive than Goldendoodles. Nonetheless, an Aussiedoodle puppy will still set you back upwards of $1,500.

Aussiedoodle vs Goldendoodle – Comparison Chart

Features

Goldendoodle

Aussiedoodle

Size:

Toy, Medium, Mini, Standard

Toy, Medium, Mini, Standard

Coat color:

Black, golden, chocolate, blonde, cream, apricot, red

Gray, tan, black, white, merle

Coat type:

Straight, wavy, curly

Straight, wavy, curly

Shedding:

Depends on coat length

 Depends on coat length

Hypoallergenic:

Yes (curly coats)

Somewhat (curly coats)

Lifespan:

10 to 15 years

10 to 16 years

Temperament:

Friendly, lively, affectionate

Friendly, lively, affectionate, intense

Trainability:

Trainable

Highly trainable

Health:

Generally good if well-bred

Generally good if well-bred

Barking:

Sometimes barks

Doesn’t bark much

Intelligence:

Intelligent and eager to please

Super-intelligent and quick to learn

Price:

 $2,000 and upward

$1,500 and upward

Goldendoodle

Size:
Toy, Medium, Mini, Standard

Coat color:
Black, golden, chocolate, blonde, cream, apricot, red

Coat type:
Straight, wavy, curly

Shedding:
Depends on coat length

Hypoallergenic:
Yes (curly coats)

Lifespan:
10 to 15 years

Temperament:
Friendly, lively, affectionate

Trainability:
Trainable

Health:
Generally good if well-bred

Barking:
Sometimes barks

Intelligence:
Intelligent and eager to please

Price:
$2,000 and upward

Aussiedoodle

Size:
Toy, Medium, Mini, Standard

Coat color:
Gray, tan, black, white, merle

Coat type:
Straight, wavy, curly

Shedding:
Depends on coat length

Hypoallergenic:
Somewhat (curly coats)

Lifespan:
10 to 16 years

Temperament:
Friendly, lively, affectionate, intense

Trainability:
Highly trainable

Health:
Generally good if well-bred

Barking:
Doesn’t bark much

Intelligence:
Super-intelligent and quick to learn

Price:
$1,500 and upward

In Conclusion

Did you enjoy our comparison of Goldendoodles and Aussiedoodles? If you found the information in the guide helpful, please share it!

Aussiedoodles and Goldendoodles have some notable differences in personality and coat color. As both these breeds are hybrids, every puppy will be slightly different, depending on how much of each parent’s genetic profile the youngsters inherit. 

Both breeds are intelligent, trainable, loving dogs that make excellent family pets. However, the Aussiedoodle can be more intense and focussed when it comes to training. Of the two breeds, Goldendoodles tend to be more popular and are, therefore, more expensive, especially the hypoallergenic, curly-coated types.

What type of Doodle did you choose; Goldendoodle or Aussiedoodle? Tell us in the comments box below.

Meet our writer

Alison Page was brought up with dogs and various other pets! For a few years, Alison worked as a Practice Manager in a small animal veterinary clinic. Alison is now a full-time writer, specializing in creating articles on the care and training of dogs, cats, and fish.

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